Spotlight

MOOCs remain on Carolina’s drawing board

Online education has been around a while. The University of Phoenix started its online program in 1989, and ads for other online degree programs are now common. The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education initiated Carolina Courses Online in 1997, and since then more than a score of online graduate and professional school…

Pepper’s Pizza paintings thrive in new home

Mark Katz had two thoughts last March when he heard the beloved eatery Pepper’s Pizza would close immediately after 26 years on Franklin Street. “I don’t know which came first, the thought, ‘I need to get one more slice of pizza,’ or ‘I need to get a hold of those paintings,’” said Katz, chair of…

How big is Carolina?

Just how big is Carolina? Personally, we think it’s not too big and not too small — but just right. More than 18,000 undergraduate students and another 10,000 or so graduate and professional students attend the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. UNC-Chapel Hill has 32 residence halls, two main dining centers, 13 libraries and…

True democracy eludes Russia

About the only thing people in the United States remember about the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow is that the U.S. team was not there. Led by President Jimmy Carter, the U.S. was among 65 countries that boycotted the games in protest of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan the year before. Graeme Robertson – who…

Antidote can deactivate new form of heparin

Low-molecular-weight heparin is commonly used in surgeries to prevent dangerous blood clots. But when patients experience the other extreme – uncontrolled bleeding – in response to low-molecular-weight heparin, there is no antidote. Now researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have created a synthetic form of low-molecular-weight heparin…

Rush to victory: A UNC-Duke time-lapse

Miss out on North Carolina’s 74-66 victory over top-10 Duke on Feb. 20? Here’s one way to relive it – in about two minutes. Using seven cameras and 19 camera angles (yes, that Smith Center catwalk is waaaaaay up there), five UNC communications staffers captured everything from the concession stand to the basketball museum to…

Algorithms, robotics: healing potential

Robotic tentacles are on Ron Alterovitz’s mind. The UNC computer scientist and his research group have been investigating new algorithms to enable a robotic device to go deep inside the human body to precisely treat abnormal growths, tumors and other ailments. The snake-like set of concentric tubes is the focus of Alterovitz’s quest to send…

Life in the fast lane

From its raw beginnings on Southern dirt tracks after World War II, NASCAR transformed itself into a sports colossus, attended by crowds in the hundreds of thousands, watched on television by the second-largest viewing audience in sports and bankrolled by the largesse of the Fortune 500’s elite. But as it rounds the first curve of…

Lives discovered

Details from the lives of black artisans in North Carolina, unseen for more than 100 years, are being discovered by UNC students using digital resources recently made available through Ancestry.com subsidiary Newspapers.com and the University library. The students are in an American Studies first-year seminar, The Family and Social Change in America. On a recent…